Okay, Pixar, okay. We get it. You have figured out how optimally to tug at our heartstrings.

MV5BYjQ5NjM0Y2YtNjZkNC00ZDhkLWJjMWItN2QyNzFkMDE3ZjAxXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyODIxMzk5NjA@._V1_UY268_CR3,0,182,268_AL_Coco is a solid installment in the series of Pixar-unexpected-weeping features. Fortunately it is also clever and adorable.

A boy, Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez), grows up in a family in which music has been banned, because his great-great-grandfather left to go be a great musician and never came back. They make shoes instead. His great-grandmother, the eponymous Coco (Ana Ofelia Murguía), is extremely old and her memory is going. Jaime Camil (Rogelio from “Jane the Virgin”) is his mild-mannered dad!

Now, Miguel, inevitably, loves music. He idolizes the late singer and guitarist Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt), and, on the Day of the Dead, attempts to steal his guitar to compete in a talent show. Because his family has destroyed his own guitar. And because he’s oddly okay with grave-robbing.

Well, it’s the Day of the Dead, so the division between the worlds of the dead and the living is permeable, and Miguel accidentally ends up in the world of the dead. His street dog also comes. He runs into most of his dead relatives, as well as a good-for-nothing skeleton called Héctor (Gael García Bernal). Héctor is in danger of being forgotten–his photo is not displayed by his family and his soul is not given ofrendas, and he is desperately trying to cross over and provide somebody, at least, with a photograph. He and Miguel make a deal to help each other. Shenanigans, as they say, ensue.

The world of the dead is brilliantly and hilariously drawn, particularly the bureaucracy that dictates whether or not the souls can visit their families and the customs officers who comment on the quality of the ofrendas. It is also desperately–desperately–sad. We see the fate of a soul who has been entirely forgotten, and it is heartbreaking.

The animation is gorgeous, the songs are good, and somehow a world full of skeletons is only moderately disconcerting. Oh, and the Frida Kahlo gags are great.

Director: Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina
Rating: PG
Length: 105 minutes
Score: 4/5