Archives for posts with tag: taika waititi

MV5BMjMyNDkzMzI1OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODcxODg5MjI@._V1_UX182_CR0,0,182,268_AL_Or, Thor: Ragnarok.

So. The Thor movies might be my favorite, as an oeuvre, because the Iron Man movies start out over-written and the Captain America movies become tedious. The Thor movies are just kind of joyously bad.

Except this one, which is joyously rather good.

Odin (Anthony Hopkins) dies, which depresses his sons and releases his daughter, Hela (Cate Blanchett), from imprisonment. She is the goddess of death, and she wants to take over Asgard. She manages to banish both Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) to a garbage planet on which Thor becomes an enslaved gladiator and Loki becomes a member of the local dirtbag elite, because of course. This planet is managed by Jeff Goldblum (Jeff Goldblum), who runs the fights and has a hilarious and bloodthirsty assistant, Topaz (Rachel House). Also there is Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), an angry drunk lady (Tessa Thompson), and a sentient walking rock called Korg, who is voiced by Taika Waititi and exists solely for comic relief. He is terrific.

Naturally much of the film is the attempt to get back to Asgard and deal with Hela, but, unlike other Marvel movies which would take the “dead dad” and “goddess of death” and “fraternal friction” tropes and go to a miserable place of tiresome angst, Ragnarok keeps it light. That is not to say that this film does not take things seriously–it does, but with Waititi’s deft touch it does not get bogged down in the gravity. The movie is a little too long, but the pacing is sufficiently frenetic that this rarely grates.

And the soundtrack is great. It’s not trying too hard to motivate a specific kind of nostalgia (Guardians of the Galaxy, I’m looking at you), but is instead humorously on-the-nose: Led Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song” for Thor’s theme or “Pure Imagination” from Willy Wonka during what seems like an acid trip.

Stray observations:

  • “I’m not a witch.” “Then why are you dressed like one?”
  • Is Loki ever going to get a real person haircut? Also: this was a return to the original Thor‘s endless string of squirrelly Loki faces and I am at home for that.
  • I’m glad that Idris Elba isn’t too proud to continue being in these movies. A soupçon of Heimdall is very welcome.

Director: Taika Waititi
Rating: PG-13
Length: 130 minutes
Score: 4/5

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This movie is a mock-documentary about vampires in New Zealand made by half of the team from “Flight of the Conchords.” That’s probably all the information you need to go and get your grubby mitts on it, but if not:

Viago (Taika Waititi) is our main point of contact with the documentary crew. He’s a vampire of the 18th century dandy type, and we encounter him as he’s trying to roust all of his flatmates out of their respective vampire sleeping situations for a flat meeting. First we meet Deacon (Jonny Brugh) hanging in a closet; he’s the newest of the vampires and vaguely rebellious. Next up is Vladislav the Poker (Jemaine Clement), who is having some sort of red satin orgy; he is obviously your bog-standard central European mediaeval-type vampire. Finally there is Petyr (Ben Fransham), an ancient Nosferatu-type who resides in the basement, doesn’t speak, and is surrounded by the remains of his victims, which Viago thinks is gross.

As the movie goes on, you see them do standard flatmate things: argue about whose turn it is to do the dishes, try to go to nightclubs (tricky if you need to be invited in), and have fraught encounters with the local werewolves (led by our old friend Rhys Darby). Deacon’s familiar Jackie (Jackie van Beek) lies to the dry cleaner about bloodstains, irons frilly shirts, and generally shows us (hilariously) how difficult it would actually be, day-to-day, to be a vampire’s familiar. The practicalities indeed often come into play–what if you hit a main artery by accident? what kind of prey would child vampires prefer? how do you learn about technology?–as the gang wanders around Wellington, and it’s perfectly composed and thought through.

The acting is over the top, of course, but consistently hits exactly the right humorous note. There’s some body horror, again of course, but the context makes it less jarring, and it could be a lot less tasteful. And, for all that it is straightforwardly a comedy about, you know, blood-sucking monsters, it gets surprisingly deep and rather touching. The genre is one of my favorites, and this is a terrific example.

Stray observations:

  • Rhys Darby wants his crew to watch their language: “Werewolves, not swearwolves!”
  • Viago is amazingly charming and sympathetic, even when he is in the process of murdering someone.

Directors: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi
Rating: R
Length: 86 minutes
Score: 5/5